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Yahweh’s Divorce from the Goddess Asherah in the Garden of Eden

Did you know?

Mythology Matters

Hebrew Bible scholars have long recognized that the writer who penned the story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden and much other narrative in the first 5 books of the Hebrew Bible (called the Pentateuch, or Torah) had a distinctly anti-Canaanite agenda, and that his anti-Canaanite polemic started in his Eden story. Focusing on this helps us to decipher the meaning of that story, as I have stressed in my new book, The Mythology of Eden, and in talks that I’ve given on the subject at scholarly conferences.

This author, known as the Yahwist (because he was the first author of the Hebrew Bible to use the name Yahweh for God), most clearly set out his anti-Canaanite views at the beginning of his version of the Ten Commandments, in Exodus 34:12-15, where Yahweh warns the Hebrews against associating with the Canaanites, intermarrying with them, and worshipping their…

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Blackbird magic — Druid Life

Here’s a bird very associated the summer: the blackbird! Well, only the males are black (and their song is lovely!); the females are brown.

(Well, besides the blackbirds, we have also many turtledoves here where I live!)

Blackbirds sing the sun down, as well as singing it up. To my mind, this makes them threshold guardians for the passage between night and day. In quiet surroundings with a fair density of blackbirds, it’s possible to hear them exchanging fragments of melody. They have huge repertoires. Being modestly sized garden birds, and birds […]

via Blackbird magic — Druid Life

Reblog:How the present changes the past

“History changes, I’m telling you. OK, the things that actually happened way-back-when don’t really change, but our interpretation of them sure does. It’s amazing how much our understanding of ancient Minoan culture has changed in the century or so since Sir Arthur Evans first uncovered the ruins of the temple complex at Knossos.” Laura Perry – it’s a […]

via How the present changes the past — Druid Life

Happy Valentine’s Day

I wish I could put this inside all people’s heads! So much romantic music and TV programs at this day becomes terribly boring!

Fiercely Bright One

I am re-posting this because some people may need or want the reminder: This Valentine’s Day, please remember that there are all kinds of love. This isn’t just a day for couples. There are many kinds of love: self-love, love between friends and family as well as pets. So celebrate this Valentine’s Day with anyone you love. And don’t forget to love and pamper yourself too.

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Fragile things

Please, think about this! Humans aren’t stronger than the Nature. We are part of It!

Druid Life

Butterfly wings and spiderwebs. Cherry blossom. Snowflakes. Ecosystems. Nature is full of fragility, full of beautiful delicate improbabilities depending on improbable balances, strange niches, and more than a little luck. In anything else, fragility of being is often considered a source of beauty and of wonder.

When we think about humans, fragile goes with weak. Special snowflake. The sensitivity that is admired in a predator, or a photosensitive plant is a world away from the sensitivity so often derided in humans. For whatever reason, we have decided that strong is the quality to have in humans. Strong, powerful, ambitious, potent, rugged, tough, resilient. These are the qualities we praise. To say a child is delicate is to imply there’s something wrong with them. If an adult is fragile, they are sick. To be sensitive is not to live in the real world, allegedly. I’ve yet to locate this real world…

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